Making use of all my wool

Spinning and felting Oct 17

With the help of a friend of mine I have taken up a new hobby, spinning and felting. Thanks to the loan of a pair of hand carders and the spindles I bought years ago, I am now producing the beginning of uneven and bumpy yarn. My kids enjoy it as well and together we are slowly, very slowly, using up one of the sheep fleeces we have.

As I explained in a previous blog (see post Shedding the winter coats) sheep fleeces are considered a waste product and are pretty much useless. Unless you have some fancy and exclusive mohair sheep and particularly if your sheep are intended for meat or dairy, the price you get for the fleece will only about cover the cost of the shearing.

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A real spindle for my yarn. Great fun!

I have recently been baffled by some interesting opinions on sheep shearing online, where some animal rights activists have classified it as animal abuse. I guess you can only have this opinion if you haven’t seen the relief on the sheep after shearing on a hot day (Shedding the winter coats), or if you’ve had to deal with flystrike and maggots in the fleece after hot and humid weather (don’t miss post Disgusting sheep chores). A good shearer is quick, efficient and careful, the fellow we use is all that and taciturn to boot, you won’t even get a grunt out of him and the sheep are as meek as…well, sheep. Sheep are fully domesticated animals, which really just means that they cannot live in the wild without the help of humans. There are of course breeds that are better at this, but it does not apply to most of the breeds you see in the European countryside.

While I meant to get the fleeces to the mill for a few euros each, I kept forgetting. Instead I have sacks of fleeces waiting to be used and no time better to start at the “Spinning Day” in Ennis. Attended by a whole group of local spinners and a friend of mine who had promised to give me the first rudimental skills, so my girls and I got two of what I hoped where my best fleeces and got a lesson with both the spindle and the spinning wheel.

According to the women spinning there, the fleeces were not bad at all, they were of fairly long and soft fibers. I had rinsed one of the fleeces a couple of times and laid it out to dry in my polytunnel, the other I brought with me in its raw state. I did give one away to another local spinner, she was delighted with the gift.

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A drop spindle, easy to bring anywhere.

The spinning is very relaxing, there is something almost hypnotic about it and it can be hard to stop. My kids enjoy it as well, and since I’m not worrying about creating the perfect yarn they are welcome to spin at any time, of course it usually turns out they want to spin when they see me doing it, particularly after I have prepared a good few skeins (carded pieces of wool). We’ve decided that the yarn will be used for a Christmas knitting project, so I better get more wool spun.

The other thing I tried my hand at is needle felting. Being a right Pinterest addict and a bit of imagination, I was able to figure out the basics of this craft, which is another addictive and hypnotising pastime. It is exactly what it sounds like, you literally shape wool by compressing it into shapes with a needle, which you punch through the wool endlessly. You can add colours and shades, to create whatever you like. Have a quick look at Pinterest and you will be amazed at the creations. I will for now show of my first project, a tiny unicorn made with my own sheep’s wool with fancy coloured mohair wool added to it, just for the effect.

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My first attempt at needle felting. A bit lumpy but not too bad, if I can say so myself.

I love learning new skills and there crafting something with your hands is incredible relaxing and therapeutically, but there is also something sad about old-time and traditional crafts. There is one thing all the spinners at the event were in agreement on, spinning doesn’t pay. Many of them used their beautiful wool for different projects, whether this be hand knitted jumpers, scarves or other clothing items. These are items that have a sentimental and artistic value, but few people could imagine paying for the time spent on such a project. That is true for most crafts, unfortunately.

Regardless of the economical imbalance of crafting, there are few things that give such gratification as creating something from scratch. For me it goes even one step further, it is to be able to appreciate all aspects of my animals and farming. I have reared and cared for these sheep, they have provided meat for me and now I can say that I have not wasted any part of them.

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Me and my sheep bestie, simply called “The kind one”. Its time to give her a proper name.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Making use of all my wool

    • casaceoil says:

      It was a bit of a surprise that I could make it, to be honest. Now I need to work on getting smoother finishes. Great fun doing it though.

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